2017 Speakers

Speakers

The Honorable Debbie Dingell, US House of Representative

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell represents the 12th District of Michigan in the U.S. House of Representatives. Before being elected to Congress, Debbie was the Chair of the Wayne State University (WSU) Board of Governors. An active civic and community leader, she is a recognized national advocate for women and children.

For more than 30 years Debbie served one of Michigan’s largest employers, the General Motors (GM) Corporation, where she was President of the GM Foundation and a senior executive responsible for public affairs. In her commitment to job creation, Debbie led the effort to bring the 10,000 Small Businesses initiative, a $20 million partnership designed to help create jobs and economic growth, to southeast Michigan. She is a past chair of the Manufacturing Initiative at the American Automotive Policy Council.

Debbie has led a number of efforts and initiatives related to young people and education stemming from her role as a WSU Governor and co-chair of the Children’s Leadership Council, a business-led advocacy group that promotes investment in early childhood education. She chaired the Michigan Infant Mortality Task Force, the Baby Your Baby public education campaign that reduced infant mortality rates in Michigan, and has served on the board of Michigan’s Children, the only statewide independent voice working to ensure that public policies are made in the best interest of children from cradle to career. She was appointed by Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm to serve on the Early Childhood Investment Corporation and the Cherry Commission on Higher Education and Economic Growth.

Debbie holds both a B.S.F.S. in Foreign Services and an M.S. in Liberal Studies from Georgetown University.

Rebecca R. Taylor, Senior Vice President. National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS)

Rebecca R. Taylor is the Senior Vice President for the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), the largest non-profit R&D consortium in North America focused on Manufacturing. She is responsible for strategic partnerships, oversight of all government programs as well as management of the Washington, DC office.

Ms. Taylor serves on the Board for the National Advanced Mobility Consortium, the Society for Manufacturing Engineers and Girls Inc. She also is on the Executive Committee of the National Defense Industrial Association’s Manufacturing Division, the NASA Marshall Partnership Forum Steering Council and the International Women’s Forum. She serves on the Advisory Board of the Commission on Innovation, Competitiveness and Economic Prosperity at the Association for Public and Land Grant Universities. Ms. Taylor is also the recipient of the national STEP award recognizing outstanding women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Production.

Ms. Taylor holds a Bachelors degree from the George Washington University and a Masters degree from the London School of Economics.

Paul Snyder, Chair of Transportation Design Center for Creative Studies  

Automotive designer and alumnus (’87 Transportation Design) Paul Snyder’s experience spans four continents and encompasses both exterior and interior development for a number of automotive brands, including Ford, Lincoln, Renault, Honda and Acura. For Ford Motor Company, he designed exterior and interior solutions for the Taurus/Sable and Explorer production vehicles and later oversaw projects for the Taurus X, Ford Five Hundred, Ranger, and Flex production vehicles.

Prior to joining CCS, Snyder worked at Honda Research and Development in California where he was Assistant Chief Designer, overseeing production and concept projects for the Civic, Accord, Crosstour, Odyssey, Tokyo Motor Show EV-Ster Concept and Honda AC-X Concept theme vehicles, as well as a 2013 Acura RL vision theme.

Snyder previously taught transportation design and visual communications at Pratt Institute as well as a range of undergraduate and graduate courses at Wayne State University and CCS. In addition to his work as car designer, Snyder is an accomplished figure painter, sculptor, and collagist, having earned a Master of Fine Arts degree cum laude in fine art and cultural studies from the New York Academy of Art in New York City, where he has also shown his work.

Paul Snyder, Center for Creative Studies, Chair of Transportation Design
Automotive designer and alumnus (’87 Transportation Design) Paul Snyder’s experience spans four continents and encompasses both exterior and interior development for a number of automotive brands, including Ford, Lincoln, Renault, Honda and Acura. For Ford Motor Company, he designed exterior and interior solutions for the Taurus/Sable and Explorer production vehicles and later oversaw projects for the Taurus X, Ford Five Hundred, Ranger, and Flex production vehicles.

Talia Y. Moore, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology department at the University of Michigan

Talia Y. Moore is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology department at the University of Michigan, and has spent the past 10 years working in Biomechanics and Bioinspiration. She recently completed her Ph.D. in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at the Harvard University Concord Field Station, where she studied the convergent evolution and biomechanics of bipedal ricochetal locomotion in desert rodents. For her graduate research, she caught and studied hopping rodents on three continents, and established quantitative methods for characterizing non-steady-state locomotion. Prior to her graduate studies, she worked at UC Berkeley in the PolyPEDAL lab, where she discovered tail-assisted pitch control in a terrestrial lizard and studied the effect of mass distribution on dynamic stability in cockroaches. She has been published in journals such as Nature, Biological Cybernetics, Current Biology, and Integrative and Comparative Biology. Her collaborations with roboticists and engineers have been presented at conferences such as IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology, IEEE International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, and Dynamic Walking.

Henry Liu, Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Henry Liu is currently a Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is also a Research Professor at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI). Prior to joining the University of Michigan, Dr. Liu was an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Dr. Liu received his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 2000 and his Bachelor degree in Automotive Engineering from Tsinghua University (China) in 1993.

Dr. Liu’s research focuses on traffic network monitoring, modeling, and control, which includes traffic flow modeling and simulation, traffic signal operations, network traffic assignment, and mobility applications with connected and automated vehicles. Dr. Liu is a managing editor of the Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems and an associate editor of Transportation Research Part C. He is also on the editorial board of Transportation Research Part B, Network and Spatial Economics, Transportmetrica Part B, and IET Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems.

Rick Jarman, President & CEO National Center for Manufacturing Sciences

Mr. Jarman leads NCMS, the largest collaborative R&D consortium in North America which is dedicated to driving innovation in commercial, defense, and robotics manufacturing. Prior to this position, Jarman was Director of Technology Partnerships at the Eastman-Kodak Company where he was a driving force to forge alliances with industry and government in order to improve commercialization processes through innovation and technology. Rick managed global relationships and programs with policy makers, partners, and consortia management in order to leverage synergistic and strategic partnerships.  In 1988, he represented Kodak on the President’s Commission on Executive Exchange. He played a key role on the trade committee during the Commission’s meetings in the USSR and Western Europe and served as Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Production and Logistics in the Pentagon. Rick serves on industry boards and advisory groups related to his work in building collaborative alliances. He is the Co-author of the book “Collaborative R&D: Manufacturing’s New Tool” published by John Wiley & Sons N.Y.

CJ Chung, Professor of Computer Science, Lawrence Technological University

chung125x100CJ Chung attended HongIk University in Seoul, Korea, where he earned a B.S. degree. While he was working for Electronics and Telecommunication Research Institute from 1982 to 1992, he was involved in developing TDX switching systems that became later the base system for the first CDMA system in the world. Chung also worked as a visiting researcher to develop AXE software for L.M. Ericsson Co. in Sweden in 1984. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Wayne State University in 1997. His doctoral research was the development of a self-adaptive system motivated by cultural evolution process, which was then applied to solve various optimization problems. His current research interests include evolutionary computation, cultural algorithms, evolutionary robotics, evolutionary-neuro-fuzzy algorithms, software engineering for robotics, and robotics education. Prof. Chung founded an autonomous robot competition, Robofest (www.robofest.net). Over 14,000 students from 14 states in the US and 7 countries have competed in Robofest since 1999. He launched numerous robotics education programs such as RoboParade in 2006, VCC (Vision Centric robot Challenge) in 2007, RoboMusic Camp in 2013, and GRAF (Global Robotics Art Festival) in 2013. He is the faculty advisor of Lawrence Tech’s humanoid roboCup soccer and IGVC (Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition) teams. His IGVC team, H2Bot won 1st place award in 2007. He received The Mary E. and Richard E. Marburger Distinguished Achievement Award in 2007 at LTU. In 2011, IEEE USA honored Dr. Chung with its citation of honor award for his leadership in founding the Robofest competition to inspire interest in engineering among pre-college students.